Last week, the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate dropped after three straight weeks of increases. In mid-June, this rate spiked dramatically from 5.23% to 5.78%. Now, it’s sitting at 5.7%. 

News of increasing inflation and larger than expected


Federal Reserve

rate hikes created some


volatility

in the markets, which caused mortgage rates to rise. Whether they’ll increase further depends largely on inflation and how the markets and the Fed respond to it.

During the early stages of the pandemic, mortgage rates dropped, which encouraged consumers to buy homes at unprecedented rates. The average 30-year fixed mortgage rate hit an all time low of 2.65% in 2021. Today, that rate is over three percentage points higher from its historic low. The added cost of borrowing has priced some buyers out of the market, which has had a cooling effect on homebuying.

Today’s mortgage rates

Mortgage type Average rate today
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Today’s refinance rates

Mortgage type Average rate today
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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mortgage rates on Zillow

Mortgage calculator

Use our free mortgage calculator to see how today’s mortgage rates will affect your monthly and long-term payments.

Mortgage Calculator



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%

$1,161
Your estimated monthly payment
More details
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It indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options.

Total paid

$418,177

Principal paid

$275,520

Interest paid

$42,657

Ways you can save:

  • Paying a 25% higher down payment would save you $8,916.08 on interest charges
  • Lowering the interest rate by 1% would save you $51,562.03
  • Paying an additional $500 each month would reduce the loan length by 146 months

By plugging in different term lengths and interest rates, you’ll see how your monthly payment could change.

Are mortgage rates going up?

Mortgage rates started ticking up from historic lows in the second half of 2021, and may continue to increase throughout 2022.

In the last 12 months, the Consumer Price Index rose by 8.6%. The Federal Reserve has been working to get inflation under control, and plans to increase the federal funds target rate four more times this year, following increases in March, May, and June.

Though not directly tied to the federal funds rate, mortgage rates are often pushed up as a result of Fed rate hikes. As the central bank continues to tighten monetary policy to lower inflation, it’s likely that mortgage rates will remain elevated.

What do high rates mean for the housing market?

When mortgage rates go up, home shoppers’ buying power decreases, as more of their anticipated housing budget has to go toward paying interest. If rates get high enough, buyers can get priced out of the market completely, which cools demand and puts downward pressure on home price growth.

However, that doesn’t mean home prices will fall — in fact, they’re expected to rise even more this year, just at a slower pace than what we’ve seen in the past couple of years.

What is a good mortgage rate?

It can be hard to know if a lender is offering you a good rate, which is why it’s so important to get preapproved with multiple


mortgage lenders

and compare each offer. Apply for preapproval with at least two or three lenders.

Your rate isn’t the only thing that matters. Be sure to compare both what your monthly costs would be as well as your upfront costs, including any lender fees.

Even though mortgage rates are heavily influenced by economic factors that are out of your control, there are some things you can do to help ensure you get a good rate:

  • Consider fixed vs. adjustable rates. You may be able to get a lower introductory rate with an adjustable-rate mortgage, which can be good if you plan to move before the intro period ends. But a fixed rate could be better if you’re buying a forever home because you won’t risk your rate going up later. Look at the rates your lender offers and weigh your options.
  • Look at your finances. The stronger your financial situation, the lower your mortgage rate should be. Look for ways to boost your credit score or lower your debt-to-income ratio, if necessary. Saving for a higher down payment also helps.
  • Choose the right lender. Each lender charges different mortgage rates. Picking the right one for your financial situation will help you land a good rate.

Disclosure: This post may highlight financial products and services that can help you make smarter decisions with your money. We do not give investment advice or encourage you to adopt a certain investment strategy. What you decide to do with your money is up to you. If you take action based on one of our recommendations, we get a small share of the revenue from our commerce partners. This does not influence whether we feature a financial product or service. We operate independently from our advertising sales team. Read our editorial standards.


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